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, were penetrating in 1995 and 1994 into the soils. he went back to vietnam with his son jim who's one of the proponents of the mission. he was the highest ranking military figure to return to vietnam at that time. and he was a leader in convincing president clinton to open, to normalize relations with vietnam. and that's another interesting -- and, actually, president clinton asked him to get general westmoreland onboard on all this. and bud played a very central role in getting general westmoreland to recognize the importance of opening up a relationship with vietnam. and so the watch really never ended for bud. and that's why in 1998 the president of the united states, bill clinton, would give him the presidential medal of freedom for everything he had done on behalf of generations of people. he never stopped fighting, as president clinton said. never stopped fighting for those who had no power. so my book is not so much a story about his different commands, and it's not an official naval history. i leave that to the next generation of naval historians who will have is the access to
constant in 1921, whom jim spoke about in his introduction, and later when dorothy was the chief of the bureau in berlin was as courageous as her american trend, possibly more so spirits intent on breaking through that concrete ceiling of male dominated the literature and journalism they both were intent on confronting the pivotal issues of their time head-on, and they would remain friends of their lives. it was as humble as a beginning as dorothy. she was born sicily isabel on the a outskirts of london in 18922 space thailand mother with musical aspirations in a truly gifted journalist father when she abandoned them to poverty. she was both devastated and in the liberated. as angry as she was, she liked thompson was able to convince herself. naughty and rebellious ms. fairfield first tried to be an actress which was a terrible thing for a respectable woman to do but early on, she realized that her true passion and the devotee was the spoken word coming and she became a feminist journalist as a tool for initiating social change. by the age of 20, she had earned a reputation as a
and choice and possibility and sacrifice. so wonder if you could go back. i know you were in the jim crow south in baker county, in georgia and you were daddy's girl. and trying to get all gangster driving the tractor at 4 years old and in the streets and neighborhood. tell us about that. >> well, you know, we were in baker county, out, you hear about, you read about some of the i have haves of earlier years but the gator and the sheriff in our county wanted to be known as the gator. the gator actually ruled every thing, everyone in the county. you can't imagine looking at the western from earlier days anyone like him but he was worse than what you have seen in your worst western. but growing up in that we, my family lived, my great-great grandparents had come to baker county. i don't know whether they came as slaves or not but i know they end up there as share croppers and with the up tent on buying land and that they did. they bought enough land that the area where i grew up was still today called hawkins town and lots of family. but it was that way, you know, the hawkins lived in one a
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3